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The Management of Shattered Identity: Screening of German Films April 20–23


April 20, 2018
7:00pm - 8:00pm
Harvard Film Archive, 24 Quincy Street Cambridge, MA 02138
April 20, 2018
7:00pm - 8:00pm
Harvard Film Archive, 24 Quincy Street Cambridge, MA 02138

In conjunction with its special exhibition Inventur—Art in Germany, 1943–55, the Harvard Film Archive is screening five complementary German films from the period. The series is curated by Eric Rentschler, the Arthur Kingsley Porter Professor of Germanic Languages and Literatures and Director of Graduate Studies at Harvard University.

Friday, April 20 at 7:00pm: Under the Bridges
 (Unter den Brücken)

Directed by Helmut Käutner. With Hannelore Schroth, Carl Raddatz, Gustav Knuth. Germany 1945, 16mm, b/w, 99 min. German with English subtitles

Friday, April 20 at 9:00pm: Film Without a Title 
(Film ohne Titel)

Directed by Rudolf Jugert. With Hans Söhnker, Hildegard Knef, Irene von Meyendorff. West Germany 1948, 35mm, b/w, 90 min. German with English subtitles

Saturday, April 21 at 7:00pm: Between Yesterday and Tomorrow (Zwischen gestern und morgen)

Directed by Harald Braun. With Hildegard Knef, Winnie Markus, Sybille Schmitz

Germany 1947, DCP, b/w, 107 min. German with English subtitles

Saturday, April 21 at 9:15pm: The Lost One (Der Verlorene)

Directed by Peter Lorre. With Karl John, Peter Lorre, Renate Mannhard. West Germany 1951, 35mm, b/w, 99 min. German with English subtitles

Monday, April 23 at 7:00pm: Jonas

Directed by Ottomar Domnick. With Robert Graf, Dieter Eppler, Elisabeth Bohaty. Germany 1957, 35mm, b/w, 81 min. German with English subtitles

About

German postwar cinema occupies a liminal sector of film history, sandwiched between Nazi-era productions and the New German Cinema of the 1970s. The signatories of the 1962 Oberhausen Manifesto indicted the light entertainments of the Adenauer era (1949–63), dismissing its escapist comedies, Heimatfilme(“homeland films”), and melodramas as examples of a moribund “Papa’s cinema.” The judgment was dismissive and unfair. Postwar German cinema in fact gave rise to numerous innovative, critical, and formally striking productions. Professor Rentschler’s series revisits a period in film history that until recently has been overlooked, putting on display such buried treasures as Under the Bridges, which was shot on location in Berlin during the last months of the war; the avant-garde Jonas; and Peter Lorre’s single directorial exercise, The Lost One.



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