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New Research on Europe Seminar

Will Women in Elected Office Reduce Corruption?


December 6, 2019
11:00am - 12:30pm
Hoffmann Room, Adolphus Busch Hall Directions
December 6, 2019
11:00am - 12:30pm
Hoffmann Room, Adolphus Busch Hall Directions

While there is overwhelming evidence of the detrimental effects of corruption on human well-being and economic development, efforts to contain corruption often fail. Over the last two decades, studies have consistently found a strong association between the share of women in elected office and lower levels of perceived corruption.

While equal opportunities and women’s rights are firmly rooted in human rights norms and declarations, the interest in women’s representation has gained substantial leverage from the notion that women representation could also change politics for the better. International organizations, aid agencies and governments promote women representation as a cure for mismanagement, corruption and public service delivery failures. This has sparked an intense debate about how the share of women in politics is linked to lower levels of corruption.

Does female representation really reduce corruption? If so, why? And, will the effects of including women in office last over time?

About

The New Research on Europe Seminar serves as a weekly forum in which CES Visiting Scholars present their work. Scholars present their work in a form accessible to scholars working in fields other than their own. Papers may be circulated in advance, although this is not required.

The seminar encourages discussions across disciplinary as well as national boundaries. After each presentation, there is ample time for critique and discussion, followed by the CES Friday Lunch. This seminar is open to the public.

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