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View of Adolphus Busch Hall from the Courtyard

Mr. Germany

in Die Zeit on December 9, 2020

Zum Tod des großen Institutionengründers Guido Goldman

Remembering Guido Goldman: Obituary Notices

Remembering Guido Goldman: Obituary Notices

December 9, 2020

Guido Goldman lived a full life and has left an enduring legacy. His contributions to transatlantic relations and scholarship will be forever immortalized in the institutions he helped created and partnerships he forged. Below are the obituaries which outline and honor his extraordinary life.

Guido Goldman, CES Founding Director and Visionary Europeanist, Dies at Age 83

Guido Goldman, CES Founding Director and Visionary Europeanist, Dies at Age 83

November 30, 2020

It is with sadness that we share the news that Guido Goldman, Co-Founding Director of CES, died on November 30, 2020 at the age of 83. Goldman, who had a brilliant mind, was a visionary Europeanist who left an indelible mark on Harvard, the field of European studies, and the partnership between Germany and the United States.

Markovits Honored with Festschrift

November 5, 2020
Markovits Honored with Festschrift

Andrei S. Markovits, a long-time friend of CES and the Arthur F. Thurnau Professor and the Karl W. Deutsch Collegiate Professor of Comparative Politics and German Studies at the University of Michigan, was honored with a Festschrift in Germany.

Recovery and Resilience - Jens Weidmann on the EU's current economic response and the road ahead

October 29, 2020

The last time President of the Deutsche Bundesbank Jens Weidmann spoke at Harvard’s Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies (CES), the economic landscape was fundamentally different. Returning almost seven years later, he addressed the consequences of a global pandemic, a joint shock to demand and supply, and the short-term as well as possibly longer run ramifications.

Misremembering the British Empire

Misremembering the British Empire

Maya Jasanoff in The New Yorker on October 29, 2020

On a cloud-spackled Sunday last June, protesters in Bristol, England, gathered at a statue of Edward Colston, a seventeenth-century slave trader on whose watch more than eighty thousand Africans were trafficked across the Atlantic. “Pull it down!” the crowd chanted, as people yanked on a rope around the statue’s neck. A few tugs, and the figure clanged off its pedestal. A panel of its coat skirt cracked off to expose a hollow buttock as the demonstrators rolled the statue toward the harbor, a few hundred yards away, and then tipped it headlong into the water.

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