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Social Inclusion and Poverty Eradication: An International Workshop

Session 1: Stigmatizing, Shaming and Isolating the Poor


November 17, 2016
9:15am - 11:30am
Lower Level Conference Room, Busch Hall

Social Inclusion and Poverty Eradication: An International Workshop

Session 1: Stigmatizing, Shaming and Isolating the Poor


November 17, 2016
9:15am - 11:30am
Lower Level Conference Room, Busch Hall
November 17, 2016
9:15am - 11:30am
Lower Level Conference Room, Busch Hall

About

Chair: Devah Pager, Sociology and Public Policy, Harvard University

9:15 a.m.

Robert Walker, Professor of Social Policy, Oxford University, UK

Shame, stigma and the take-up of social assistance: Insights from rural China

Discussant: William P. Alford, Harvard Law School, Harvard University

Stigma is one of the reasons for low take-up of social assistance benefits, deterring participation in anti-poverty programs despite financial need and social rights.China is an apparent deviant case, with rapidly falling poverty and high up-take of Dibao, the world’s largest social assistance scheme.Given the poor targeting and considerable local discretion in administering the program, recipients must balance two stigmas, of poverty but also abuse of the system.There are dangers of implementing social assistance without supportive political, legal and cultural infrastructures.

10:00 a.m.

Nora E. Groce, Professor & Director, Leonard Cheshire Disability & Inclusive Development Centre, University College London, UK

Persons with Disability: At risk and too often overlooked

Discussant: Kathryn Sikkink, Harvard Kennedy School, Harvard University

Until the new Sustainable Development Goals of the United Nations, SDGs, inclusion and anti-poverty policies neglected the cumulative disadvantages of people with disabilities, who were treated under a medical model. Under the new SDG resolutions, they are now mentioned throughout the international call to ‘leave no one behind.’ This paper reports on research that establishes clearer links among disability, social inclusion and poverty, drawing upon three research projects in Africa, such as the life trajectories of persons with disabilities who beg for their living.

10:45 a.m.

Kim Samuel, Professor of Practice, Institute for the Study of International Development, McGill University, Canada

Social connectedness and poverty eradication: A South African perspective

Discussant: Sue J. Goldie, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University

Social isolation is a deprivation of social connectedness intricately linked to the causes and consequences of both social exclusion and poverty. This paper presents case studies on this neglected dimension of multidimensional poverty analysis, drawn from the Social Connectedness Programme in South Africa. It illustrates mechanisms for overcoming exclusionary relations affecting children and youth, and shows how local support of social relationships are linked to social-economic empowerment by enabling resource mobilisation and enhancing the employability and well-being of young people.

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